Consuming Research without Indigestion

Buy

SURGEON GENERAL’S WARNING: Swallowing Research Findings without Chewing Can Cause Indigestion. Reading a research study without the necessary tools to evaluate the validity of the author’s findings can often feel like a bout of indigestion. Not everyone needs to read original research. Academic texts and other trusted sources are often enough. However, this presentation is for those trainers and consultants who want to judge for themselves the extent to which research claims can be considered credible. A systematic approach to evaluating research studies will help you make more informed decisions about how reported findings should impact what you do.

In this Session, the logic behind two main research perspectives will be introduced—group designs and single subject designs—and a structured way to evaluate the validity of these designs will be explored.

Susan G. Friedman, PhD

Susan G. Friedman, PhD, is a professor emeritus in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. She has helped pioneer the cross-species application of behavior analysis to animals, using the same humane philosophy and scientifically sound teaching technology that have been so effective with human learners.


Susan has co-authored chapters on behavior change in four veterinary texts, and her popular articles have been translated into 13 languages. She offers seminars on animal learning at conferences and zoos around the world, is a member of Karen Pryor Clicker Training’s ClickerExpo faculty, and teaches yearly hands-on animal training workshops with Steve Martin at Natural Encounters, Inc.

The Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the American Humane Association (AHA) Film and TV Unit, Susan is a member in good standing of ABAI, AZA, ABMA, IAABC and IAATE.

This year Susan was included on the Vet Tech College’s list of 15 Animal Professors to Know. Her acclaimed online course, Living and Learning with Animals for Behavior Professionals, has provided even wider dissemination of effective, humane, behavior-change practices to students in more than 30 countries.